respect

Why respect gained from a position is temporary, but respect gained from virtues is not

When it comes to respect, there are two types – the kind that you gain from your position and the kind that you gain from your virtues and attitudes. But which one is more lasting? Which one do you think has more value? The answer may surprise you! In this article, we’ll discuss why respect gained from a position is temporary, but respect gained from virtues and attitudes can last forever..

What is Respect?
The respect you get through a position is short-lived and temporary. But the respect that you gain because of your virtues, your attitude, is there with you all the time. The best thing to do when someone talks down to you is to be respectful back; they’ll never bother you again.

What are Virtues?
But the respect that you gain because of your virtues, your attitude, is there with you all the time. Respect gained through a job may be temporary, and soon forgotten. However, if it was earned through virtues then it will last forever. If you maintain virtue and keep your attitudes positive then people will remember that they respected you even when they don’t know why anymore.

Kindness, Compassion
The value of what you do or say has no bearing on how respected you are. You can be respected and loved for the qualities that make you who you are, and there is nothing that anyone can do to take those away.

Honesty, Trustworthiness
Honesty, Trustworthiness are two of the most important virtues to gain. They are among the most difficult to keep up in day-to-day life.
It’s easy to tell lies when we want something we can’t have, or don’t want people to know what we’re really like. It’s much harder when there are good people around us who depend on our trust and honesty for guidance and protection.

Fairness, Honesty
Fairness, Honesty , Loyalty and Respect are the four qualities of character that define who you are and how people see you. You don’t need to hold a title to be respected for these things. Titles come and go, but who you are remains unchanged.

Patience
Patience is the virtue that we need to cultivate in order to make us more likely to be respected. The virtue of patience will help us when it comes to things like being willing to wait our turn, understanding that things take time and happen in their own time and refusing to let impatience get the best of us.

Generosity
Generosity often springs out of the deep desire to give back to those who have given so much. If you are generous with your money and time, then you will gain the respect of others because of this virtue. When I think about generosity, I can’t help but think about Mother Teresa. She was selfless and helped people with no thought for herself. She gave back to those who had given her so much in life. Her generosity led her to being one of the most respected human beings in history!

Altruism
Altruism , or showing kindness to others without expecting anything in return, can make you more respected by people. By doing something good for someone else and expecting nothing in return, you are demonstrating your integrity.

No Shelf Required With E-Readers at Your Fingertips

No Shelf Required With E-Readers at Your Fingertips

With hectic schedules ruling the day, people often underestimate the importance of taking time to relax and recharge—even if for only a few minutes.

To that point, why not do so with a good book? Whether you’re curled up on the couch after work or simply on your lunch break, eReading companies such as Kobo have enough options to keep you interested—and relaxed.

No matter what age you are, there’s something for everyone’s taste or preference.

The 20s can be fraught with stress and tension. You’ve left the comfort of home, so now what? Consider books that will help direct you on your own path. There is “How to Be Interesting” by Jessica Hagy and “The Defining Decade: Why Your Twenties Matter—And How to Make the Most of Them Now” by Meg Jay.

The 30s might have you pondering marriage and family, in which case, “Smart Parenting for Smart Kids: Nurturing Your Child’s True Potential” by Eileen Kennedy-Moore and Mark S. Lowenthal might be informative and invaluable reads. For a mind-candy read that’s sure to entertain, try “Bridget Jones’s Diary” by Helen Fielding.

By their 40s, people are looking for a little romance or a thrill. Books such as “Inferno” by Dan Brown, or “Committed” by Elizabeth Gilbert may have just the appeal you’re looking for.

In your 50s, the kids are (hopefully) out of the house, and you now have time to read and travel. To that end, “Still Alice” by Lisa Genova and “Live By Night” by Dennis Lehane could be the thing to toss in your suitcase.

The 60s, or Golden Years, mean retirement and the ability to enjoy the things you love most. Whether it’s spending time with family, keeping fit, or curling up with a good book, there is “Beautiful Ruins” by Jess Walter or “Paris” by Edward Rutherfurd.

As well as offering instant access to millions of titles online, digital reading companies offer a cornucopia of eReading device options and free reading apps for most smartphones and tablets, making it easy to expand your “just read” list. Whatever your age—young or old, married or single—books are a source of entertainment, escape and inspiration, but most of all, enjoyment.

അവർ ചെടികൾ നടട്ടെ

അവർ ചെടികൾ നടട്ടെ

ഇന്നു ജൂൺ 5 ലോക പരിസ്ഥിതി ദിനം. ലോകമെങ്ങും ആളുകൾ മത്സരിച്ച് സോഷ്യൽ മീഡിയകളിൽ പരിസ്ഥിതി ദിനം ആഘോഷിക്കുന്നു. ഇന്നത്തോടെ അതെല്ലാവരും മറക്കുകയും ചെയ്യുന്നു.

പരിസ്ഥിതിയെ സംരക്ഷിക്കുക എന്നുള്ളത് നമ്മുടെ ഓരോരുത്തരുടെയും കടമയാണ്. നമ്മുടെ പുതിയ തലമുറയെ പരിസ്ഥിതിയെയും, പ്രകൃതിയെയും സംരക്ഷിക്കാൻ പഠിപ്പിക്കാം . അതു നമ്മുടെ ഓരോരുത്തരുടെയും വീട്ടിൽ നിന്ന് തന്നെ തുടങ്ങാം. അവർ ചെടികൾ നടട്ടെ, അതിനെ സ്നേഹത്തോടെ പരിചരിക്കട്ടെ. ചെടികൾ വളരട്ടെ, നിറയെ പച്ചപ്പുള്ള മരങ്ങൾ ആയി മാറട്ടെ.


നമ്മുടെ കുട്ടികൾ മറ്റുള്ളവർക്ക് മാതൃകയാവട്ടെ. നന്മകൾ നിറഞ്ഞ കുട്ടിക്കൂട്ടങ്ങൾ ഉണ്ടാവട്ടെ. അവർ ചെടികൾ നടാൻ മത്സരിക്കട്ടെ. നട്ട ചെടികളെ പരിചരിക്കാൻ , സ്നേഹിക്കാൻ അവർ മത്സരിക്കട്ടെ.

നമ്മുടെ പുതിയ തലമുറക്കേ ഇനി എന്തെങ്കിലും ചെയ്യാനാകൂ. തകർത്തു തരിപ്പണമായിക്കൊണ്ടിരിക്കുന്ന നമ്മുടെ പരിസ്ഥിതിയെ നമുക്കെല്ലാവർക്കും ചേർന്നു തിരിച്ചു പിടിക്കാം. തിരിച്ചു പിടിച്ചേ പറ്റൂ.. അതെ നമുക്കതിനു കഴിയും നമുക്കെ കഴിയൂ..

പ്രിയപ്പെട്ടവരെ ഇന്നത്തെ ദിവസം മാത്രമല്ല ഇനിയുള്ള ഓരോ ദിവസവും നമുക്ക് ആഘോഷിക്കാൻ പരിസ്ഥിതി ദിനമായി.

എല്ലാവർക്കും നല്ലത് മാത്രം വരുത്തട്ടെ എന്ന നിറപ്രാർത്ഥനയോടെ. 🥰🥰🥰🥰🥰

Dr. സജീവ് ദേവ്.
www.sajeevdev.com

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Avoid Body Drought — How to Prevent Dehydration

BodyDrought_SOCIt’s in every living cell, tissue and organ, and it’s second only to oxygen as the thing we need most to survive—pure, clean water. We can’t live without it, and we can’t live well without enough of it. We are constantly in need of water as we lose water with every breath and every activity of the body. We are especially at risk for dehydration when we exercise or we are ill—this is when dehydration, even mild dehydration, can take its toll, causing you to feel tired and drained of energy. Anyone may become dehydrated, but young children, older adults and people with chronic illnesses are most at risk.

Dr. Julie Scarano, a doctor of chiropractic who is trained in prevention and wellness (in addition to providing care for neuromusculoskeletal conditions such as neck or back pain, for which chiropractors are most well known) believes it’s better to prevent dehydration than to treat it. She also reminds you that the 23 intervertebral discs in your spine have high water content and that dehydration can be associated with spinal pain.

Here are some preventative tips to help avoid dehydration:

•    Choose your beverages wisely. Avoid or limit fruit juices, sodas, alcohol and high-sugar sports drinks.

•    Drink a glass of water during and between meals, as well as before, during and after exercise.

•    Plan outdoor activities for cooler parts of the day.

•    Eat foods that are high in water content, such as fruits and vegetables.

•    Make water your go-to beverage of choice.

For more tips and information and to find a doctor of chiropractic near you, visit www.F4CP.org/findadoctor.

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Reduce Stress for a Healthier Heart

Whether it’s from everyday deadlines, financial struggles, or the COVID-19 pandemic, stress shows up often in life. And your body reacts to it: your heart rate increases, your blood vessels narrow — and over time, these little blows can add up and do damage to your health, particularly your heart. With chronic stress, you’re more likely to have high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, obesity, and poor sleep. Even other parts of your body — from your lungs to your gut — can take a hit.But while you can’t always limit the amount of stress in your life, you can work on changing how you respond to it. Just like the automatic “fight or flight” response that kicks in when you’re scared — your muscles tense, heart rate increases, and brain becomes more alert– your body also has a built-in, healthy relaxation response. When that’s triggered, the opposite happens: your breathing and heart rate slow down, and your blood pressure decreases.Luckily, with practice, you can learn to trigger that response. Try these techniques on your own or find a teacher or class to help you get started. Don’t get discouraged if you don’t get the hang of it quickly. And if one approach doesn’t work for you, try something new. You can learn to de-stress in lots of other ways.Meditation. One of the most studied approaches for managing stress, this involves developing your ability to stay focused on the present, instead of worrying about the past or future. Find a quiet location with as few distractions as possible. Get comfortable by either sitting, lying or walking. Focus your attention on a specific word or set of words, an object or your breathing. And let distractions, including thoughts, come and go without judgment.Progressive muscle relaxation. To feel the effect, first tense your muscles for a few seconds, then relax them. Start by tensing and relaxing your toes, then your calves and on up to your face. Do one muscle group at a time.Deep breathing. Take in a slow, deep breath, let your stomach or chest expand and then exhale slowly. Repeat a few times. Many people don’t breathe deeply, but it is relaxing and something you can do anytime, anywhere.Guided imagery. This involves a series of steps that include relaxing and visualizing the details of a calm, peaceful setting, such as a garden.Practice self-compassion. Understand that life’s challenges are inevitable. Give yourself the care and tenderness you need when experiencing difficulty. Getting your mind and body to a place of calm doesn’t always mean being still, however. Other healthy ways to manage stress include taking a yoga or tai chi class, talking to a professional counselor, joining a stress management program or an art class, or meeting up with friends for a brisk walk. Being in nature can be very soothing for some people. Combining de-stressors such as these with other healthy habits can go a long way toward strengthening your heart. Eat more veggies, fruits and whole grains, and less sodium, sugar and saturated fats, for example. Move your body more — such as through dancing and walking meetings. Find exercises you actually love and do them regularly. Get enough good, quality sleep. And develop a strong social support system. Then rethink some of the familiar ways you may be coping with stress, such as drinking alcohol frequently, using drugs and other substances, smoking or overeating. They can actually worsen your stress — and your health. Taking care of your heart health is a lifelong journey, but at a time when the risk of severe illness from COVID-19 remains higher in people with poor cardiovascular health, learning new ways to make your heart strong has become even more important. You can learn more about heart health from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute by visiting www.nhlbi.nih.gov. If you need help finding additional resources to help you cope with stress, talk to a healthcare provider. Seek urgent care if you can’t cope at all or have suicidal thoughts. Resources are also available at nimh.nih.gov/health/find-help. 

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Got Water? 4 Reasons to Drink More H2O

WhyWaterWe all know water is good for us and that we should probably drink more of it. So why, then, do Americans find it so difficult to sip from what is arguably the fountain of youth?

Answers vary, but the fact is, one in 10 Americans drinks zero cups of water per day, according to a study by Dr. Alyson Goodman, a medical epidemiologist for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Zero. She suspects that those who don’t drink any water (or very little) are getting it from other sources such as food and coffee, but warns this may not be enough.

“Many health risks decrease when you drink plain water,” says Goodman.

Which is why, she says, the results are “mindboggling.”

Robert Eakle, CEO of Alkame Water, agrees. “Without water, no living thing can survive,” he says. “It affects every area of our life and is an essential part to maintaining proper health.”

However, not all waters are created equal. Enhanced waters, like Alkame Water, provide the body with more health benefits than regular water. Just take a look at how it can help:

•    It balances body fluids. Your body is composed of about 60 percent water and performs vital functions such as protecting your organs and tissues, regulating your body temperature and carrying nutrients and oxygen to your cells—essentially it keeps your body running like a well-oiled machine.

•    It keeps skin looking healthy. Water moisturizes your skin and functions as a protective barrier to prevent excess fluid loss (think free anti-aging cream). In addition, it can keep your skin fresh and smooth.

•    It boosts the immune system. Those who guzzle water are at a lower risk of getting sick. This crystal-clear concoction helps fight against flu, cancer and other ailments—especially if your water has mild alkaline properties, such as those found in Alkame Water. Including ionized water in your daily intake can give your immune system a boost through added antioxidants, improve aerobic capacity, enhance energy levels and through a patented technology that alters the molecular structure of water, hydrate your body more fully.

•    It can help control calories. While drinking water may not be a weight-loss strategy, per se, substituting it for higher-calorie or sugar-filled beverages can help by removing by products of fat, filling you up so you’re not noshing, acts as a natural appetite suppressant and raises your metabolism.

Alkame Water, Inc., is a wholly owned subsidiary of Alkame Holdings, Inc. (OTCQB: ALKM). For more information about Alkame Water and its health benefits, visit www.alkamewater.com.

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Tips for Parents on Teaching Kids Life Skills

Parenting is hard, and the past year was especially challenging for parents of school-aged kids, as they struggled to juggle their children’s virtual school and the loss of many activities and in-person contact with friends.The goal of MASK (Mothers Awareness on School Age Kids) is to provide resources for parents, children, schools, and communities that address the challenges facing families and empower children to make safe and healthy choices. MASK is a nonprofit organization founded in 2007, and has evolved into a multimedia format that includes a website, a print magazine, an app, a digital learning platform, and a series of YouTube videos.MASK tackles topics that include managing peer pressure, coping with trauma, and negotiating the peaks and valleys of social media, which can be especially challenging as families restore their networks and return to in-person school and activities.”MASK programs teach children and their families how to handle the ever-changing landscape that our children are living in,” says Kimberly Cabral, CEO, founder, and publisher of MASK.Parents and their kids can engage with the MASK tools to build life skills and promote self-esteem through any or all of these options:- MASKMatters app. Download the app on Apple or Google Play (also available in Spanish) for easy access to age-appropriate life skills resources that can be used by students, parents, and teachers.- MASK Magazine. For those who like their information in print, MASK Magazine is a quarterly parenting manual and is also available through Zinio digital. Each issue focuses on a specific topic, such as Internet safety, with details on how it impacts children from preschool to college.- MASK E3 Institute: The digital platform for MASK can be used by schools, community organizations, or families at home. The Institute is designed as a series of year-long comprehensive programs for different age groups: MASK Storytime for pre-K children, MASK Academy for kindergarten through sixth grade, MASK Prep for middle and high school students, and MASK Leadership for colleges students. Each of the age-appropriate programs teach kids social skills and educate them about topics such as bullying, drug and alcohol use, and staying safe online.- MASK + Live: MASK offers a series of YouTube videos featuring feature medical doctors, clinical psychologists, professors, and other child health professionals who share their expertise on parenting and offer advice on physical health, mental health, and enhancing your relationship with your child.Visit maskmatters.org for more information about the full range of MASK materials and programs. 

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Study Shows Older Americans Are Coping Best During the Pandemic

If you think older Americans have struggled to cope through the pandemic, think again. According to new research by financial services firm Edward Jones, they have actually been faring far better than their younger counterparts.

The Edward Jones and Age Wave Study focused exclusively on how different generations have held up emotionally and financially in the months since the lockdowns began, and some of its findings are at least as startling as how quickly even 70-year-olds came to love Zoom.

“COVID-19’s impact forever changed the reality of many Americans, yet we’ve observed a resilience among U.S. retirees in contrast to younger generations,” says Ken Dychtwald, Ph.D., the founder and CEO of Age Wave, a leading research think tank on aging, retirement and longevity issues.

While acknowledging upfront that the virus itself disproportionately struck aging adults, the five-generational sampling of 9,000 people, age 18 and over, reveals more than a few surprises. Among them:

• While 37 percent of Gen Zers, 27 percent of Millennials, and 25 percent of Gen Xers say they’d suffered “mental health declines” since the virus hit, only 15 percent of Baby Boomers responded likewise.

• Faring the best were those 75 and over – the Silent Generation that followed the so-called “Greatest Generation” – with a mere 8 percent of those respondents reporting any mental health deterioration. That would seem to run counter, as does the results for Boomers (age 56 to 74), to early warnings that prolonged social isolation made older adults especially vulnerable to depression, anxiety and cognitive decline.

• Nearly 68 million Americans have altered the timing of their retirement due to the pandemic, and 20 million have stopped making regular retirement savings contributions.

Dychtwald attributes the two older generations’ resilience to having “a greater perspective on life.”

“They’ve seen wars and other major disruptions before,” he says, “and they know that this, too, will pass. Younger generations feel like, ‘What happened to my life? I mean, I was supposed to go to college or I was starting a new job, and now everything has changed.’”

Most retired Boomers and Silent Gens also had monthly Social Security checks to fall back on. Which explains why – though the pandemic has significantly reduced the financial security of a quarter of Americans – younger generations were slammed the hardest: Nearly one-third of Millennial and Gen Z respondents characterize the impact as “very or extremely negative,” compared to 16 percent of Boomers and 6 percent of Silent Gens who admitted to similar hardship.

Looking for any silver lining that’s come out of the COVID-19 crisis?

Well, 67 percent of respondents did say it’s brought their families closer together.

“The pandemic has certainly thrown into sharp relief what matters most in our lives,” says Ken Cella, Edward Jones’s client services group principal. “And important discussions have taken place about planning earlier for retirement, saving more for emergencies, and even talking through end-of-life plans and long-term care costs.”

And with the study also showing that an overwhelming percentage of retirees yearn for more ways to use their talents to benefit society, financial services firm Edward Jones believes it’s time to redefine retirement more “holistically” to encompass what it calls “the four pillars” of health, family, purpose and finance.

Successfully addressing most of those pillars admittedly takes more financial savvy than many of us have, though, especially given ever-rising costs. But a financial advisor, such as a local one at Edward Jones, has the perspective, experience and empathy to help.

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VR Camera Creates Immersive Experience

Have you ever thought about what it might be like to relive the best moments of your life, and be able to share them with others? Maybe it’s the dance floor at your wedding. Or the birth of your child or his or her first birthday. Maybe it’s that touchdown that led your team to victory in the last seconds of a game. With today’s mobile virtual reality technology, it’s possible to create virtual memories and it has never been easier to get started.

Humaneyes Technologies, an innovator in camera technology, has developed a user-friendly, dual camera that combines 360-degree photography with immersive 3-D Virtual Reality (VR), all in one simple-to-use solution that costs about the same as a decent DSLR
camera.

“360-degree pictures and video continue to change how we use cameras to capture the world around us,” says media expert Jim Malcolm of Humaneyes Technologies. “And the global adoption of VR headsets, combined with 3-D cameras, is providing even more ways to create virtual content and virtual memories.”

“We’ve done it with the best, from documenting Mako sharks with The Discovery Channel to weightless experiences in the International Space Station, floating more than 250 miles above the horizon.”

“We’re now excited to watch, firsthand, as consumers create their own immersive personal stories,” says Malcolm.

The Vuze XR flips easily from a 360-degree camera to a VR180 camera and shoots both virtual video and photos. Whether you’re recording or live streaming, users can create and share virtual experiences at that moment, and then save them to revisit next week or next decade. Special features of the VUZE include 18-Mega Pixel still images, built-in stabilization, filters, and a VR editing suite. Plus, it doesn’t get more portable.

“Everything can be viewed, controlled and edited, right from your phone, so that you can shoot, create and share virtual videos at a moment’s notice,” says Malcolm. But not everything needs to be virtual; the VUZE also functions as a 5.7K and 4K up to 60fps 2D camera for capturing high-resolution video and pictures to fill out your photo album.

Think ahead to the holidays and how the latest in VR technology can help make unforgettable memories and connect far-flung family and friends. The VUZE XR camera also features live streaming and social sharing for platforms, including Facebook and YouTube, so that you can bring your social media audience into the scene with you.

For more information on the VUZE XR camera and how to create your own virtual experiences and memories, visit www.humaneyes.com.

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No Shelf Required With E-Readers at Your Fingertips

With hectic schedules ruling the day, people often underestimate the importance of taking time to relax and recharge—even if for only a few minutes.

To that point, why not do so with a good book? Whether you’re curled up on the couch after work or simply on your lunch break, eReading companies such as Kobo have enough options to keep you interested—and relaxed.

No matter what age you are, there’s something for everyone’s taste or preference.

The 20s can be fraught with stress and tension. You’ve left the comfort of home, so now what? Consider books that will help direct you on your own path. There is “How to Be Interesting” by Jessica Hagy and “The Defining Decade: Why Your Twenties Matter—And How to Make the Most of Them Now” by Meg Jay.

The 30s might have you pondering marriage and family, in which case, “Smart Parenting for Smart Kids: Nurturing Your Child’s True Potential” by Eileen Kennedy-Moore and Mark S. Lowenthal might be informative and invaluable reads. For a mind-candy read that’s sure to entertain, try “Bridget Jones’s Diary” by Helen Fielding.

By their 40s, people are looking for a little romance or a thrill. Books such as “Inferno” by Dan Brown, or “Committed” by Elizabeth Gilbert may have just the appeal you’re looking for.

In your 50s, the kids are (hopefully) out of the house, and you now have time to read and travel. To that end, “Still Alice” by Lisa Genova and “Live By Night” by Dennis Lehane could be the thing to toss in your suitcase.

The 60s, or Golden Years, mean retirement and the ability to enjoy the things you love most. Whether it’s spending time with family, keeping fit, or curling up with a good book, there is “Beautiful Ruins” by Jess Walter or “Paris” by Edward Rutherfurd.

As well as offering instant access to millions of titles online, digital reading companies offer a cornucopia of eReading device options and free reading apps for most smartphones and tablets, making it easy to expand your “just read” list. Whatever your age—young or old, married or single—books are a source of entertainment, escape and inspiration, but most of all, enjoyment.

Learn more at www.kobo.com/ereaders.